Dr. Jiqiang Wang, China, on Lithium-ion batteries

Dr. Jiqiang Wang, China, on Lithium-ion batteries

Argonne, Il, September, 2008 – At the 1st International Conference on Advanced Lithium-ion batteries for automobile applications, organized by Argonne National Laboratory, Dr. Jiqiang Wang of the Tianjin Institute of Power Sources (TIPS) sat down and talked to me about Lithium-ion battery development in China.

Dr. Wang said that the Government sponsored Project 863 has groups working on two different chemistries for batteries: maganese and iron phosphate.

I first heard of Project 863 in 2004 at a Challenge Bibendum event. Even then they were working on green vehicles for the Olympics. At the Olympics there were more than 300 electric vehicles.

China is not yet beholden to the internal combustion engine. China has recently started setting fuel-economy rules and looking for ways to clean the air and lessen the dependence on oil. China has a program called the 863 program. It is a five year program with a budget of $108 million for electric vehicle research and development.

The Institute of Automobile Electronic Technology is undertaking research under the National 863 program of China. Some of the development issues they are working on are:
*The Development of the QR Pure Electric Car. Sponsored by the State Key High-tech Research Program (the National 863 Program of China).
*The Development of the Control System for the multi-powersource powertrain of the Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle (FCEV). Sponsored by the State Key High-tech Research Program (the National 863 Program of China).
*The Development of Ni-MH Battery and Its Management System for FCEV and QR EV. Sponsored by the State Key High-tech Research Program (the National 863 Program of China).
*The Development of the the high-pressure common rail fuel injection electronic control diesel engine named YC6112. Cooperated with one factory.If China realizes they dont need internal combustion engines and partners with the correct companies China can be part of the economic growth that will come from creating an infrastructure, patents, and technologies that are needed to create another source of energy. A source of energy that reduces their dependence on imported oil.

About the Author:

Lou Ann Hammond is the CEO of Carlist and Driving the Nation. She is the co-host of Real Wheels Washington Post carchat every Friday morning and is the Automotive, energy correspondent for The John Batchelor Show and a Contributor to Automotive Electronics magazine headquartered in Korea. Hammond is a member of the North American Car and Truck of the Year (NACTOY), Women's World Car of the Year (WWCOTY), and the Concept Car of the Year.