Engineering the 2015 Chevy Colorado and 2015 GMC Canyon on Driving the Nation

Engineering the 2015 Chevy Colorado and 2015 GMC Canyon on Driving the Nation

Anita Burke, Chief engineer for Chevy Colorado, talked to Lou Ann Hammond, CEO, Driving the Nation, about the engineering of th 2015 Chevy Colorado and, since the GMC Canyon is on the same underpinnings, the 2015 GMC Canyon.

Burke goes through the underpinnings of the truck and how it was engineered.

From the Chevy press release:
The Colorado delivers the capability expected of a Chevy truck “ engineered to offer better payload performance than any competitor and segment-leading trailering. Like the Silverado, the Colorado has a fully boxed perimeter frame, which provides the strength to support it’s capabilities, as well as a confident, smooth and quiet ride.

A coil-over-type front suspension features aluminum knuckles that are low in mass and high in strength, contributing to a more responsive feel and efficiency. Colorado also features the segments first application of electric power steering, which enhances efficiency by avoiding the energy used by what conventionally is an engine-driven feature.

The Colorado has a short turning radius of 41.3 feet (12.6 meters), enabling easier turning in tight areas such as city streets or backing a trailer into a camping spot.

Four-wheel disc brakes, with four-piston front calipers, are standard and feature Duralife brake rotors “ also pioneered on the Silverado. They can offer up to double the service life, which can save money on maintenance.

Another Chevy truck feature offered on the Colorado is the G80 automatic locking rear differential. Introduced by Chevy more than 40 years ago, it gives drivers a traction advantage when needed. It is standard on Z71 and available on WT and LT.

The four-wheel drive system employs an electronically controlled transfer case that allows the driver to shift from 2WD to 4WD. The driver can select from three modes, 2WD, 4WD HI or 4WD Lo.

The 2.5L and 3.6L engines offered in the Colorado are based on proven designs found in other Chevrolet vehicles, but tuned uniquely for truck duty “ including more torque at lower- and mid-range rpm levels “ for a more confident feeling of power when the Colorado is loaded or pulling a trailer.

Theyre also the most efficient in the segment, with up to 27 mpg EPA-estimated highway mileage with 2.5L 2WD models and 26 mpg with 3.6L 2WD models, when properly equipped.

The 2.5L four is rated at 200 horsepower (149 kW) and 191 lb-ft of torque (259 Nm), with approximately 90 percent of the peak torque available from 2,000 rpm to 6,200 rpm. The 3.6L engine is rated at 305 horsepower (227 kW) and 269 lb-ft of torque (365 Nm).

Aluminum blocks and forged-steel crankshafts, along with dual-overhead camshafts with variable valve timing, direct injection and jet-spray piston cooling are features shared on both engines. A number of extended-life components can help reduce maintenance intervals and reduce the cost of ownership.

All models are matched with a six-speed automatic that complements the truck-tuned engines with features that make hauling and trailering easier and more comfortable, including auto grade braking and a tow/haul mode. Extended cab 2WD WT models equipped with the 2.5L engine are also available with a six-speed manual transmission.

By | 2017-03-22T08:00:08+00:00 November 14th, 2014|Categories: Automobiles and Energy, Chevy, GMC, Video, youtube.com|0 Comments

About the Author:

Lou Ann Hammond is the CEO of Carlist and Driving the Nation. She is the co-host of Real Wheels Washington Post carchat every Friday morning and is the Automotive, energy correspondent for The John Batchelor Show and a Contributor to Automotive Electronics magazine headquartered in Korea. Hammond is a member of the North American Car and Truck of the Year (NACTOY), Women's World Car of the Year (WWCOTY), and the Concept Car of the Year.