Ford-UAW negotiations on the John Batchelor show

Ford-UAW negotiations on the John Batchelor show

When I talked to John Batchelor, host of the John Batchelor radio show, the United Automobile, Aerospace and Agricultural Implement Workers of America (UAW) had cast about 20,000 of the 46,000 votes from the Ford union workers. Fity-seven percent of those voters said they wanted to approve the contract agreement. As of Monday, October 17, 2011, the approval rating was 62 percent. The deadline to vote is tomorrow, Tuesday, October 18, 2011.
At first the vote was going sideways, looking like there would be a no vote on the contract. That would mean Ford and the UAW would have to go back to the arguing table.
I don’t know if it was the comments on the blogs that swayed the workers to start approving the contract. If it were me and my contract was out in front of everyone and people were writing on blogs that if I didn’t want that contract that they would take the job it might give me some cause for concern. Especially with unemployment so high and about 12,000,000 people looking for jobs. If there were a strike you might, once again, see people from other parts of the Nation moving North for a job.
What is in the new contract?
The Detroit News says that the proposed Ford contract, reached Oct. 4, is three times more generous than the one reached between Chrysler Group LLC and the UAW.
The UAW’s website gives some of the benefit’s that they see as most significant:
UAW was able to secure unlimited $20 doctors office visit’s.
The current offer includes more than $16,700 in bonuses and profit sharing over four years and $16 billion in investment.
a commitment to 12,000 jobs, 5,750 from this contract.
$6.2 billion in factory upgrades by 2015.
A bonus and profit-sharing payments this year that total as much as $10,000 per worker. $6,000 signing bonus this year for a member that has been employed for more than a year. A $5,000 signing bonus if the member has worked for less than one year.
Brings back jobs from China, Mexico and Japan
The agreement would also raise the wages of entry-level workers from about $15.50 per hour to $19.28 per hour over the life of the contract.
The Free Press newspaper said that free legal services — a benefit cherished and used for decades by many autoworkers — will be phased out after 2014 under the tentative deal. No more free divorces, bankruptcies and wills for General Motors’ autoworkers,
It won’t give raises for senior workers or restore cost-of-living pay increases workers gave up.
Ford has 46,000 hourly workers. In 2006 Ford borrowed $23.4 billion. From 2006-2008 Ford lost $30.1 billion. From 2009-2010 Ford made $9.28 billion in profit’s.
Alan Mulally’s compensation increased 48% to $26.5 million plus $56 million  in stock for the companys turnaround.
The UAW agreed to a no strike clause with GM and Chrysler when they went through bankruptcy.
According to the UAW website, the UAW has 390,000 active members and 600,000 retired members and surviving spouses.

About the Author:

Lou Ann Hammond is the CEO of Carlist and Driving the Nation. She is the co-host of Real Wheels Washington Post carchat every Friday morning and is the Automotive, energy correspondent for The John Batchelor Show and a Contributor to Automotive Electronics magazine headquartered in Korea. Hammond is a member of the North American Car and Truck of the Year (NACTOY), Women's World Car of the Year (WWCOTY), and the Concept Car of the Year.